Posts Tagged ‘state legislative tracking’

NAAG MEETING: NIGHTMARE TO DREAM TRIP

June 12, 2014

By Steve Arthur, Vice President

parachute_hit_target_400_clr_14044My recent trip to the National Association of Attorneys General (NAAG) Summer Meeting reminded me that state government relations professionals deal not only with weighty public policy issues, but also with the choices we make about whether to attend a conference and how we get there.

We sometimes do take for granted the nice places we enjoy while attending Groups meetings. However, for anyone who has ever attended a meeting on Mackinac Island, Michigan you know that getting there can be a challenge even when everything goes well. And last week, everything did not go well getting to the NAAG Summer Meeting.

My day began with a 3:00 AM wake-up call to be on the road from Santa Fe to Albuquerque at 4:00 for the 6:00 AM flight to Minneapolis to catch the flight to Detroit to catch the flight to Pellston, Michigan to catch the bus to the dock to catch the ferry to island to get on the horse drawn taxi to the hotel. Just in time for a 7:30 dinner. At least that was the plan.

Unfortunately, Mother Nature had other ideas. Due to severe weather, the Detroit to Pellston flight was cancelled, and some on the flight were told the first available seat would be two days later. In fact some meeting attendees seriously considered asking the airline to simply fly them back home. To their credit, NAAG staff quickly arranged a charter bus to make sure the Attorneys General, staff and the rest of us could arrive in time for the next day’s opening session.

So a 45 minute flight became a 360 minute bus ride after a two hour delay in leaving Detroit. That 7:30 dinner became an order of chicken fingers at the airport and a refreshment stop at a grocery store in Flint. Of course, the bus can only take you so far when your final destination is an ISLAND. Again, NAAG staff came through with a chartered ferry 5 hours later than the last regularly scheduled ferry.

Once the meeting started the next day, a couple of things became clear. First, while the number of Attorneys General and staff were down from previous meetings, over 30 states were still represented. The big change was the number of private sector attendees, which was well below normal. This made it much easier for those of us who were there to talk with everyone we needed to for business, and also allowed more casual discussions at the social events.

Second, the bus trip became the talk of the conference. While it was definitely not the best of travel days, it was a bit of a bonding experience for those on the bus, and it will likely be mentioned at future NAAG meetings for years to come. And this brings me to my point about how travel can impact our jobs. We all know that building relationships is an important aspect of our profession and when you spend six hours with people on an unscheduled bus ride, that can definitely be a long term relationship builder. We might even start a Facebook page.

The second, and just as important, lesson from this trip is to always attend the meetings that may be difficult to get to because your competitors might not be there. You persevered – they did not – you win. Imagine how you would feel if your competitor followed this advice and you did not?

State government relations is comprised of so many elements from Legislative Monitoring to Strategic Planning, Groups issue management and Lobbying. Until this meeting, I did not fully appreciate the value of the shared travel nightmare for building relationships.

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Steve Arthur is Vice President and brings more than 20 years of public policy experience in both the public and private sector to his work at Stateside Associates. Mr. Arthur provides clients with hands on state government relations support from strategic planning and issue management to lobbyist management and direct lobbying. He is one of the leaders of Stateside’s Attorneys General practice, guiding clients through the process of working with, and lobbying, state Attorneys General.

Failed Upon Adjournment

May 20, 2014

By Constance Campanella, President and CEO

canstockphoto6453644Are there three more beautiful words to a state government relations professional? Maybe there are, but for business reasons, this triplet means the danger has passed.

Or, has it?

Legislative ideas–especially the new, innovative, and crazy–do not find their footing immediately. Ideas take time to break in and to become comfortable or at least acceptable. Rough versions of proposals become polished over time as stakeholders and advocates weigh in. Think about some ‘crazy’ notions that are now law–like bans on incandescent light bulbs, living wages, calorie disclosures at restaurants and state regulation of the Internet.

Consider that the campaigns for ideas have become more sophisticated and more integrated. Advocates open the bidding with a study. A legislator tweets approval and promises action. Fellow legislators join in. Advocates note the “trending” issue as proof the idea is gaining acceptance. The bill is introduced. More tweets and posts herald the initiative and the traditional media provides the column inches necessary to create buzz around the Capitol.

Fortunately for most businesses, the legislative process is still deliberative and new, radical ideas do not immediately find their majority and do fail upon adjournment.

Is that a red light signaling that you can stop and relax? It should not be.

Forward thinking SGR professionals would be well advised to look for these new ideas on the scrap pile and evaluate their potential for future success.

Here is the 5-point test to determine if today’s wacky idea is tomorrow’s public policy:

  1. Consider the source. Is the advocate a well-established NGO with a history of legislative success? If so, plus one point.
  2. Is the legislative sponsor a serious, committed, successful lawmaker? If so, plus one point.
  3. Has the legislature experienced a significant turnover in membership or leadership that now tilts it more towards the philosophy of the proposal? If so, plus one point.
  4. Is social media at-large or among legislators (check that out via TellTale) buzzing about the topic? If so, plus one point.
  5. Has the real media picked up the topic and supported the underpinnings of the proposal? If so, plus one point.

If your evaluation of this failed bill or idea yields four or more points, the chances are very likely that you will see this bill again and you will see this idea again elsewhere.

So, when you get the report that a bill failed upon adjournment, don’t read that as a red light. Read it as a yellow light and go faster to get ahead of the trend.

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Constance Campanella is the Founder, President and CEO of Stateside Associates. A veteran of 30 years of state and federal issue management experience, Ms. Campanella managed Stateside’s growth from a one-person firm to what one trade publication has called, “a behemoth in state lobbying.”

Call to Duty: Why Groups Enlist Business to Help with Military Challenges

April 10, 2014

By Michael J. Behm, Senior Vice President

military-civilian-handshake

Paying attention to the military has become much more than a nod to patriotism for state and local officials Groups, but rather an urgent recognition that military-related challenges facing public officials, the Department of Defense (DoD) and business are converging like never before.

The drawdown from the conflicts in Afghanistan and Iraq, a flood of returning veterans, massive defense cuts and the threat of a future round of BRAC base closures have created something of a perfect storm of challenges for DoD and the states and local governments which host its installations.

Over the last several years, state and local officials – through their respective Groups – have raced to create leadership-level task forces, special working groups, committees and websites to raise awareness about the military presence in their states, draw attention to incompatible growth around military installations, and focus on wide range of veterans issues.

As an active participant in many of these committees, I am frequently asked the question: If I am not an elected official with a military base in my backyard, should I care about what these military-focused committees are doing?

Business definitely thinks so.

The National Conference of State Legislatures’ (NCSL) Military and Veterans Task Force has been meeting since 2008, the National Association of Counties (NACo) has created a Veterans and Military Services Committee, the National League of Cities (NLC) has a Military Communities Council, the National Governors Association (NGA) has several ongoing projects addressing veteran employment and military base sustainability, the National Lieutenant Governors Association (NLGA) has featured presentations on veteran transition and the Council of State Governments (CSG) and US Conference of Mayors (USCM) have held meetings focused on military installation and veteran issues. The “Big Seven” now meets quarterly to discuss military and veteran issues critical to state and local government.

And private sector involvement with each of these Groups’ military-related programming is growing. Military-focused committee and task force meetings have featured presentations from the U.S. Chamber of Commerce’s “Hiring Our Heroes” program; Edison Electric Institute’s “Troops to Energy Jobs” Program; Walmart’s Welcome Home Commitment; and the Home Builders Institute’s training and certification of veterans for employment in the construction industry. The Groups are helping DoD and business to highlight the education, training, on-the-job experience and leadership skills that veterans bring to the civilian job market. Guiding state and local officials to interested employers, and focusing on the veteran employment challenges, have become a very high priority for the Groups over the last two years.

State and local officials Groups and businesses also recognize that finding employers is not the only challenge for recently-separated service members. Neither DoD nor state government has made it easy in the past to translate military education and training into recognized (and required) state professional certifications and licenses. With the prodding of NCSL, NGA, NACo, NLGA, and the support of organizations such as the American Trucking Associations and health professional groups, states have been enacting laws to make it easier for veterans with documented training, work experience and necessary skills to obtain professional licenses such as a CDL, EMT, LPN and PA – licensure for high demand, civilian trucking and health care jobs. In 2013 alone, legislators on NCSL’s Military and Veterans Task Force introduced bills in 16 states – that were then enacted – that ease the professional licensing requirements for skilled veterans.

The Groups are also highlighting the threats posed by uncoordinated and incompatible development and urban sprawl to the nation’s military installations and testing/training ranges and local economies. In many states, the military is among the largest industries and employers and is directly responsible for the economic health of neighboring communities by generating a steady stream of revenue and jobs. When an installation can no longer perform its intended mission – whether that’s sailing ships, flying aircraft, firing artillery, training infantry or testing new technologies – it impacts the ability to realistically train soldiers, sailors, airmen and Marines. It also puts that “mission” at risk of being relocated or subject to a future round of BRAC.

DoD’s REPI (Readiness and Environmental Protection Integration) Program has used these Groups forums to highlight its cost-sharing partnerships with organizations as diverse as The Nature Conservancy, agri-businesses, foresters, private landowners, conservationists and state and local governments to help avoid or relieve land use conflicts near military installations. These partnerships protect the local economy, critical habitats and at the same time sustain the military presence.

Raising awareness about these problems within the Groups forums, and the benefits the military provides its neighboring communities and businesses, is paying off: Dozens of bills have been enacted since the Groups began addressing everything from compatible land use policies, property buffering, coordination with local military installations about land use changes, limiting lighting that can interfere with military training to creating open space areas around military bases – many of these land use solutions having been born out of discussions at Groups meetings. A number of states – Hawaii being a good example – have also enacted legislation or implemented executive orders intended to protect the military mission by more closely coordinating with state chambers of commerce and other statewide business entities.

Many other issues are being discussed that have a state and local government-military-business nexus, such as renewable energy siting coordination, translating military training and experience into higher-education academic credit, military-energy utility partnerships, National Guard deployments, transportation and infrastructure and Tricare changes to name just a few.

Should your business be involved in those discussions?

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Michael J. Behm is Senior Vice President and a Principal of Stateside Associates. During his 20 years working at Stateside Associates, Mr. Behm’s advocacy work and leadership roles in the state officials Groups have brought him to many state capitols and local governments yielding an extensive network of relationships with legislative leaders and other public officials across the 50 states.